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Posts Tagged ‘computer’

ZTE MF627 Unlock Download

Saturday, November 13th, 2010

Important: Re-flashing of the ZTE MF627 USB Modem MUST be done on Windows XP ONLY. If you try it on another OS, you’ll brick it! (break it!)

This is the procedure I’ve now done many times.

1. Download this file from here. This contains replacement firmware, and will replace the software on the USB modem.
2. The file is a RAR archive (similar to a ZIP). So you’ll need an extraction tool to handle this file and extract the contents. e.g. winrar.
3. Extract the contents of the above file to a directory e.g. c:flash.
4. DO NOT USE A USB HUB FOR THE FLASH UPGRADE. (you’ve been warned!).MAKE SURE YOU’VE GOT PC ATTACHED TO A UPS OR USE A LAPTOP CONNECTED TO MAINS. (Enough credit in your electricity meter etc). THE FLASH UPDATE ON AVERAGE TAKES APPROXIMATELY 18-20 MINUTES TO COMPLETE, SOME COMPUTERS CAN TAKE UP TO 46 MINUTES. THIS IS A VERY LONG DANGEROUS TIME, IF IT FAILS IT WILL BRICK YOU USB MODEM. (aka stuff it!). It’s also probably a good idea to stop all other Windows XP application as well!
5. Install the software that comes with the USB modem dongle. After inserting the USB modem into your Windows XP computers’ USB port, Windows XP will do the plug N play thing, and install all the drivers, it will then Autorun the software installation and install the 3Connect GUI.
6. Unplug, and re-insert the usb modem, to check drivers are correctly loaded.
7. Select Start->Control Panel->System->Device Manager, Expand the modems section, you should see a ZTE modem.
8. Run FlashUpdate.exe in the c:\flash directory. (don’t worry that the update states is for the MF626, if you query the modem using Hayes AT commands, you’ll see this is a MF626, it’s just the MF627 is a black/green version OEMed for ‘3′)
9. The updater scans serial ports looking for the modem, when it finds the Diagnostic port, the Download Button un-greys. (you may need to maximize the application to see the Download box).
10. Wait for approximately 20 minutes. (see above) It will eventually announce when it’s completed and the Cost it took in minutes!
11. In the first few seconds, it disables autorun, and resets the modem, and waits 50 seconds before it re-appears again on the USB bus, so don’t be tempted to flash under VMware! So you should here it disconnect and re-connect to the PC (bing bong Windows XP sound!).
12. Your 3 ZTE MF627 USB Modem dongle is now been unlocked from 3 and you can put any network’s data SIM in it.
13. You’ll need to install different Connection Management software in the c:flash directory.
14. Once that’s been installed, create a new Profile for your Network Provider.

Not that this is a big issue, but I’ve noticed that using another SIM (other than 3), the light always stays in ROAM mode (solid/flashing red) rather than Green = GPRS, Blue = 3G/HSDPA.

The Telstra/3Connect connection manager software is able to correctly tell, whether you are connected at GPRS or 3G/HSDPA. You can still use your 3 SIM correctly with the 3 Connect software after flashing, but the 3Connect software will only work with a 3 SIM.

Luckily there are software programs that can over-ride this lock. I’ve used the following procedure to over-ride the lock in a 3 USB Modem (ZTE MF627) and replace the 3 SIM Card with an ASDA SIM Card. Your mileage may vary, and I will not be held responsible if this procedure fails, and turns your 3 USB Modem into a brick (breaks it!).

UPDATE (12 Dec 09) :- I originally thought that using a non-3 (three) SIM caused the ZTE MF627 to flash RED. This is not the case, RED Simply means GPRS mode!

For details on software please make a 10 GBP donation via PayPal and by return I’ll send you the software to unlock your MF627. The donation pays for the hosting of this website, and thousands of hits and free information I’ve provided on unlocking Three Mobile Modems.


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Hard Disk Drives (HDD)

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Winchester Disk Drive, Hard disk drive, Hard disc drive, HDD or ‘that big box under the desk‘ (which is the answer I often get!) or I’ve got 500GB of memory or is that disk! I don’t know!

it’s what makes most computers go, most of the time, and if they go bad or stop working, so does your computer usually!

A number of years ago (7 years), I always used Western Digital hard disk drives (HDDs) but after a spate of failures with the new (at the time) WDC WD1200JB, the JB features a 7200 RPM spindle speed coupled with three 40 GB platters. The JB’s key feature, is its 8-meg buffer, four times that of competing drives at the time. An ATA-standard 3-year warranty backs the drive.

But after many of these failed, I decided to switch to Seagate Technology, backed by a 5 Year Warranty, and hard drive manufacturer I’d not used for many years.

The hard drive manufaturer market has certainly got smaller over the last 20 years, many names have disappeared, Connor, DEC, Fujitsu, IBM, Maxtor, Miniscribe and Quantum have disappeared. Quantum acquired DEC, Maxtor acquired Miniscribe and Quantum HDD, Seagate acquired Connor and Maxtor, Hitachi acquired IBM HDD, Toshiba acquired Fujitsu HDD, Western Digital acquired Tandon HDD.

So that leaves us with

  1. Hitachi Global Storage Technologies (1967)
  2. Seagate Technology (1979)
  3. Toshiba (1967)
  4. Western Digital (1988)
  5. Samsung (1999?)

So, we still have plenty of HDD manufaturers to choose from!

Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 500Gbytes ST3500320AS and Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black WD1001FALSq

Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 500Gbytes ST3500320AS and Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black WD1001FALS

But for me, I’ve decided to go back to purchasing Western Digital Black Drives for the moment, and spread the risk between Seagate for the NASes and Western Digital Black for the workstations!

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One hell of a Mail Loop!

Friday, February 12th, 2010

I’ve been changing some mail records on DNS systems, and I got a mail bounce… It’s no wonder why I didn’t receive the email!
Diagnostic information for administrators:
Generating server: bigfish.com
username@company.co.uk
TX2EHSMHS015.bigfish.com #554 5.4.6 Hop count exceeded - possible mail loop ##
Original message headers:
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mail183-tx2-R.bigfish.com (Postfix) with ESMTP id 779AC18B0429; Sat, 13 Feb
2010 19:36:15 +0000 (UTC)
X-SpamScore: 2
X-BigFish: VPS2(zzzz1202hzzz2dh87h6bh34h43j67h)
X-Spam-TCS-SCL: 6:0
X-FB-DOMAIN-IP-MATCH: fail
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umm, you don’t say!

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Wireless (WiFi) Remote Control of X10 Modules using USB Remote Access

Sunday, December 20th, 2009
  1. The Active Home Pro software is installed on/in a virtual Windows XP Professional computer, I don’t like cluttering up my main production Workstation which happens to be Vista 64-bit Ultimate.
  2. The CM15PRO Programmable Computer Interface is connected by USB to this computer. The Active Home Pro software is the software that drives the computer interface, I’ve saved the “house file” house.ahx on my NAS (network attached storage) device, so it can be easily shared on my network.
  3. This is the clever Tech bit, USB over Network by Fabula Tech, I’ve been using this software in the virtual work I do for a few years, and it allows you to share a USB device over your network, e.g. you can plug in you USB device on one computer, and connect to it on another via your network. Very handy… USB remote access!
  4. The USB over Network by Fabula Tech is installed on the computer connected to the CM15PRO Programmable Computer Interface. We will call this the server.

USB over network

USB over network

The above snapshot, shows the USB over Network server software running, and the current USB devices attached to the server, which can then be shared, just like any resource, disk, printer etc.

USB over network device shared waiting for connection

USB over network device shared waiting for connection

The device is shared, and is waiting for a client computer to connect to it.

USB device properties

USB device properties

You can give the devices meaningful friendly names, that you’ll remember. On the client computer (remote computer), install another copy of Active Home Pro, making sure the drivers are installed for the CM15Pro. Run the USB over Network client software.

USB over Network client setup

USB over Network client setup

Select USB Device, Add, browser for the computer or enter IP address. You should see, a list of devices that can be connected to.

Client connecting...

Client connecting...

Right click the device, and click connect, if this is the first time you’ve connected to the device, you’ll get the usual, bing-bong tones, and plug N play will start and register the drives.

Now you can use your ActiveHome Pro software on another wireless (WiFi) computer, just open the *.AHX home file, from a shared location.

Client Connected to device

Client Connected to device

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Unlocking a 3 USB Modem (ZTE MF627)

Monday, June 29th, 2009

Important: Re-flashing of the ZTE MF627 USB Modem MUST be done on Windows XP ONLY. If you try it on another OS, you’ll brick it! (break it!)

This is the procedure I’ve now done twice!

1. Download this file from here. This contains replacement firmware, and will replace the software on the USB modem.
2. The file is a RAR archive (similar to a ZIP). So you’ll need an extraction tool to handle this file and extract the contents. e.g. winrar.
3. Extract the contents of the above file to a directory e.g. c:flash.
4. DO NOT USE A USB HUB FOR THE FLASH UPGRADE. (you’ve been warned!).MAKE SURE YOU’VE GOT PC ATTACHED TO A UPS OR USE A LAPTOP CONNECTED TO MAINS. (Enough credit in your electricity meter etc). THE FLASH UPDATE ON AVERAGE TAKES APPROXIMATELY 18-20 MINUTES TO COMPLETE, SOME COMPUTERS CAN TAKE UP TO 46 MINUTES. THIS IS A VERY LONG DANGEROUS TIME, IF IT FAILS IT WILL BRICK YOU USB MODEM. (aka stuff it!). It’s also probably a good idea to stop all other Windows XP application as well!
5. Install the software that comes with the USB modem dongle. After inserting the USB modem into your Windows XP computers’ USB port, Windows XP will do the plug N play thing, and install all the drivers, it will then Autorun the software installation and install the 3Connect GUI.
6. Unplug, and re-insert the usb modem, to check drivers are correctly loaded.
7. Select Start->Control Panel->System->Device Manager, Expand the modems section, you should see a ZTE modem.
8. Run FlashUpdate.exe in the c:\flash directory. (don’t worry that the update states is for the MF626, if you query the modem using Hayes AT commands, you’ll see this is a MF626, it’s just the MF627 is a black/green version OEMed for ‘3′)
9. The updater scans serial ports looking for the modem, when it finds the Diagnostic port, the Download Button un-greys. (you may need to maximize the application to see the Download box).
10. Wait for approximately 20 minutes. (see above) It will eventually announce when it’s completed and the Cost it took in minutes!
11. In the first few seconds, it disables autorun, and resets the modem, and waits 50 seconds before it re-appears again on the USB bus, so don’t be tempted to flash under VMware! So you should here it disconnect and re-connect to the PC (bing bong Windows XP sound!).
12. Your 3 ZTE MF627 USB Modem dongle is now been unlocked from 3 and you can put any network’s data SIM in it.
13. You’ll need to install different Connection Management software in the c:flash directory.
14. Once that’s been installed, create a new Profile for your Network Provider.

Not that this is a big issue, but I’ve noticed that using another SIM (other than 3), the light always stays in ROAM mode (solid/flashing red) rather than Green = GPRS, Blue = 3G/HSDPA.

The Telstra/3Connect connection manager software is able to correctly tell, whether you are connected at GPRS or 3G/HSDPA. You can still use your 3 SIM correctly with the 3 Connect software after flashing, but the 3Connect software will only work with a 3 SIM.

Luckily there are software programs that can over-ride this lock. I’ve used the following procedure to over-ride the lock in a 3 USB Modem (ZTE MF627) and replace the 3 SIM Card with an ASDA SIM Card. Your mileage may vary, and I will not be held responsible if this procedure fails, and turns your 3 USB Modem into a brick (breaks it!).

UPDATE (12 Dec 09) :- I originally thought that using a non-3 (three) SIM caused the ZTE MF627 to flash RED. This is not the case, RED Simply means GPRS mode!

For details on software please make a 10 GBP donation via PayPal and by return I’ll send you the software to unlock your MF627. The donation pays for the hosting of this website, and thousands of hits and free information I’ve provided on unlocking Three Mobile Modems.


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Unlocking a 3 USB Modem (Huawei E220)

Monday, May 4th, 2009

I purchased two Pay As You Go 3 USB Modems a few months ago from Sainsbury’s reduced from £49.99 to £12! I thought they would come in handy if I needed to go mobile with my notebook. My Orange High-speed circuit-switched data (HSCSD) data card is a little slow these days. I can surf the internet with a speed of 14.4kbit/s or if I use two time slots (bonded) can achieve a blistering speed of 28.8kbit/s, this is over the GSM network.

3 USB Modem Huawei E220 `

3 USB Modem Huawei E220 `

The 3 (http//www.three.co.uk) USB Modem is manufactured by Huawei. The model number I’ve purchased is the Huawei E220 HSDPA USB Modem. This model is often called the ‘pebble’, because it resembles a pebble, and is a small ‘dongle’ type device which connects to your computer using a USB cable.  Some folk may be put off by this model in favour of the newer “chewing-gum type sticks” modems available.

The issue I have is that 3’s Pay As You Go data tariff involves “topping up” with £10, but this does not roll over to the next month, if a portion remains unused, you need to top-up again. For £10 you are given a data allowance of 1GB. I don’t find this suitable for my use, I’m only going to use this device . occasionally. A much better tariff for me is the ASDA Mobile Pay As You Go Tariff, Calls - 8p per minute, Texts - 4p per text, Data - 20p per 1MB. ASDA mobile phone tariffs are a steal. But unfortunately, you cannot just use an ASDA SIM Card in a mobile phone which is locked to the other vendors network! I tried the ASDA SIM Card in the 3 USB Modem, and although it recognises the PIN number, it states “invalid SIM”. This is because the 3 USB Modem is SIM Locked to the 3 Network.

Luckily there are software programs that can over-ride this lock. I’ve used the following procedure to over-ride the lock in a 3 USB Modem (Huawei E220) and replace the 3 SIM Card with an ASDA SIM Card. Your mileage may vary, and I will not be held responsible if this procedure fails, and turns your 3 USB Modem into a brick (breaks it!).

  1. Remove SIM Card from USB Modem.
  2. Connect USB Modem to computer.
  3. Download DC-Unlocker Client v1.00.0267 from authors-site or here.
  4. Install the above software on your computer where you have installed the 3 USB Modem.
  5. Start the DC-Unlocker Client on your computer.
  6. Click Buy Credits. You’ll need to register with the DC-Unlocker website, and purchase 15 credits. (15 Euros) to unlock the E220.
  7. Input your username and password into the DC-Unlocker Client, it should verify your details and confirm your credits.
  8. Do not change any other settings. Make sure select manufacturers - Huawei datacards is selected, and select model is set to automatic.
  9. Click the Magnifying glass.
  10. With no SIM card installed the following will appear

DC - Unlocker 2 Client 1.00.0267

Detecting card :

selection :
manufacturer - Huawei datacards
model - Huawei E220
application port - COM4
diagnostic port - COM5

Found modem         : E220
Model               : Huawei E220
IMEI                : 35xxxxxxxxxxxx8
Firmware            : 11.117.09.01.156
Dashboard version   : HOST01.11.118.01.19.156_MAC11.201.05.00.156
Serial NR.          : Exxxxxxxxxxxxxx6
SIM Lock status     : Locked (Card Lock)

  1. Click Unlocking, Unlock
  2. The following output will confirm lock staus
  3. Unlocking, please wait …
    Card successfully unlocked !
  4. Credits left : 0
  5. Click the Magnify glass again, the following will appear

DC - Unlocker 2 Client 1.00.0267

Detecting card :

selection :
manufacturer - Huawei datacards
model - Huawei E220
application port - COM4
diagnostic port - COM5

Found modem         : E220
Model               : Huawei E220
IMEI                : 3xxxxxxxxxxxxx8
Firmware            : 11.117.09.01.156
Dashboard version   : HOST01.11.118.01.19.156_MAC11.201.05.00.156
Serial NR.          : Exxxxxxxxxxxxxx6
SIM Lock status     : unlocked

  1. The USB Modem is unlocked.
  2. Exit DC-Unlocker.
  3. Remove USB modem from computer.
  4. DC-Unlocker client works for me with the above firmware.
  5. If you re-insert your 3 SIM Card and connect to computer, the 3 software should still function.
  6. To use another SIM to connect to internet requires the Uninstallation of the 3 software and the installation of generic Mobile Partner Software from here.
  7. Install the Mobile Partner Software from above.
  8. After installation, and only after a successful installation connect the USB Modem.
  9. Plug ‘N’ Pray should install new drivers for the USB Modem.
  10. Start Mobile Partner and create a new Profile for ASDA, ASDA uses the Vodafone network, but doesn’t use the Vodafone APN!
  11. Open Mobile Partner application, choose Tools - Options - Profile Management - Click New
  12. Create a new profile. e.g. ASDA or Vodafone
  13. Select APN - Static - APN name is asdamobiles.co.uk
  14. Authentication - Access number - *99#
  15. username and password - web/web.
  16. You could create a Three Profile, details are APN - APN
    3internet. Username and password - leave blank. 
  17. Hopefully you be able to click connect and use the Internet via ASDA mobile network.
  18. I think the generic version of Mobile Partner is a much better application than the “noddy” 3 USB Modem application.
  19. The above procedure may work with different providers.

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Bluetooth stopped working!

Wednesday, April 29th, 2009

Windows Vista updated itself today with a CSR Bluetooth update, and my bluetooth stopped working between my computer and phone. I used the rollback feature to rollback the driver to the original driver shipped with the operating system dated sometime in August 2006, Bluetooth started working again! So it just goes to show, sometimes newer updates are not better!

So “IF IT AIN’T BROKE, DON’T FIX IT”

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Protected: Freeware Links

Monday, April 13th, 2009

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it’s all gone wrong!

Friday, April 10th, 2009

my new blog is crapping out, one of my TiVos crashed for the first time every - it had hung - first time in 10 years - and my computer at home is playing up, I’ve got to post this from my games rig (oh yes, I have a seperate computer to play games from!)

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Let me introduce you to our new car…

Saturday, January 26th, 2008

This is the first time I’ve seen the car in the daylight, I collected the car on Monday 21st January, and it was raining and getting dark, by the time, I arrived home it was dark. We’ve been driving and returning home from work, all week in the dark. So this is the first time, I’ve had a good look at the car and take her photo! On-board computer states we’ve averaged 36.9mpg, and we’ve only done 127 miles!

Suzuki Swift Picture No 1
Suzuki Swift VVTS 1.5GLX 5 Door Petrol in Galatic Grey Metallic.

Suzuki Swift Picture No 2
If you were wondering it’s just been newly registered on 21st January 2008, so it’s on a ‘57 plate!
Suzuki Swift Picture No 3

Suzuki Swift Picture No 4

Suzuki Swift Picture No 5

Suzuki Swift Picture No 6

Suzuki Swift Engine Picture No 1
New 1490cc Petrol Engine. Checking where I top up the wash bottle!

Suzuki Swift Engine Picture No 2
Checking where I check the oil! All seems very new!

The Peugeot 205 nearly didn’t start today! Must do something with it!

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